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After the infant has descended through the birth canal into the warm water, the mother can even choose to deliver the infant herself, as the birth attendants wait nearby in case they are needed.



It is a remarkably simple matter for the mother, after she has the last contraction which expels the baby, to reach down, take it in her arms and bring her child up out of the water and to her breast.

Typically, women who deliver in water report a feeling of excitement and lasting personal empowerment that simply cannot be matched by standard hospital birthing procedures.





Within seconds, because of air touching the skin and cord, the physiological system is signaled, and the baby easily begins to use its lungs for breathing, without being slapped or roughly stimulated. Since the cord is usually not cut for several minutes, the baby's transition to air breathing is gradual and non-traumatic, and the newborn can take its time to become familiar with using its lungs.




This gentle, slower approach is in sharp contrast to the more common but questionable practice of cutting the cord immediately after the baby is out. Cutting the baby off from its lifeline to the mother so quickly and abruptly creates a breathe or die situation, which can cause a panicky feeling in the infant. In the worst case, if there is an undetected problem and breathing is not well established before the cord is cut, cerebral palsy could result because of oxygen deprivation to the brain.

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